Zero Emission Pavilion
Hamburg

Zero Emission Pavilion Hamburg, 2011
Zero Emission Pavilion Hamburg, 2011
Zero Emission Pavilion Hamburg, 2011
Zero Emission Pavilion Hamburg, 2011
Zero Emission Pavilion Hamburg, 2011
Zero Emission Pavilion Hamburg, 2011
Zero Emission Pavilion Hamburg, 2011
Zero Emission Pavilion Hamburg, 2011
Zero Emission Pavilion Hamburg, 2011

Zero Emission Pavilion

Completely compostable room installation for Climate Week 2011 on Hamburg’s central square

Compatibility with health and the environment, material definition, recyclability, indoor air quality and diversity are a few of the parameters of increasing relevance in future planning and construction. But because building life cycles generally exceed those of ‘regular’ consumer goods many times over, the disposal and recyclability of used building materials receive much less consideration. Moreover, the service life of individual components within a building is very different. As a result, the issues surrounding building sustainability are very complex and go far beyond simply seeking to achieve energy efficiency. Eco-efficiency must therefore be an integral part of the planning strategy when designing a building. Eco-efficiency stands for goals such as greater impact, more living space, greater biodiversity, more fresh air, more beauty, intelligent rooms and greater enjoyment.

From there we define the underlying intentions:

  • Which planning strategies will enable us to achieve this?
  • Which raw materials can we use?
  • How can they be obtained?
  • How can the downcycling of building materials be avoided?
  • How can renewable energies be integrated?
  • How can the loss of fertile soil be compensated?
  • How does a building’s required lifespan and use type influence its design?
  • Which raw material cycles and resources are available for construction?

The closed circuit pavilion addresses these issues directly. It is a temporary room installation designed for use during Climate Week in Hamburg. It is composed of naturally grown support structures connected to a room framework based on SimpleTec, which is then cut into shape. The branches function simultaneously as the load-bearing structure and the spatial shell.

Projektdaten

  • Client: Aldebaran
  • Typology: öffentlich
  • City: Hamburg, Deutschland
  • GFA: 180 m²
  • Completion: 2011
  • CPH: 1-9
  • Architects: Partner und Partner Architekten
  • Team: Klaus Günter, Jörg Finkbeiner, Christian Necker
  • Structural engineering: Ziegert | Seiler Ingenieure
  • Photos: Klaus Günter

Cradle To Cradle-Kompass

  • Materials/Resources
  • Energy Supply
  • Water Management
  • Maintenance
  • Social Values
  • Diversity

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